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Please click on the appropriate semester below:

Spring 2018

Summer 2017

Fall 2017

Syllabi and schedules provided on this website are accurate at the time of posting. Students should check the revision date (rev date) listed on the first page of the syllabi and on the schedules. The final version of syllabi and schedules will be posted on iCollege for the first day of the semester and may or may not be the same as the ones posted on this website. Check the revision dates to determine if they are the final versions. If enrolled in my classes, you must go by the ones posted in the iCollege section for the course.

 

COURSE SPECIFIC NOTES

Anatomy & Physiology: If you have not passed a survey of chemistry class or the foundation of chemistry classes then you will be severely disadvantaged if you choose to take this course. The information learned though the chemistry course(s) is/are applied to this course with the assumption that you already understand that material. Concepts and material covered in the chemistry course(s) will either be covered in summary (a small amount of the information) or not covered at all. In this course you are expected to know, understand, and apply that material. You will be tested on it with how it is applied to the content of this course. This course is designed to prepare students entering allied health programs. To understand the human body, you must first understand basic chemistry. All students in the course, whether they took chemistry course(s) or not, will be assessed to the same level and have the same expectations applied to them. That is, to prepare them for allied health careers. Students who decide to take this course without having passed chemistry course(s) should be aware that they are likely to perform poorly in this course. This course will contain significantly more depth and material than a foundation (non-majors) level biology course. The workload / expectations between allied health students and foundation level students in this course will be identical.

Microbiology: If you have not passed Anatomy & Physiology 1 and 2 classes then you will be severely disadvantaged if you choose to take this course. The information learned though Anatomy & Physiology 1 and 2 is applied to this course with the assumption that you already understand that material. Concepts and material covered in Anatomy & Physiology 1 and 2 will either be covered in summary (a small amount of the information) or not covered at all (most of everything covered in anatomy and physiology). In this course you are expected to know, understand, and apply that material. You will be tested on it with how it is applied to the content of this course. This course is designed to prepare students entering allied health programs. To understand how diseases affect the human body, you must first understand how the human body functions. The discussion of the disease process as caused by microorganisms, which is the focus of this course, relies on you understanding the normal functioning of the human body in detail. All students in the course, whether they took anatomy and physiology 1 and 2 or not, will be assessed to the same level and have the same expectations applied to them. That is, to prepare them for allied health careers. Students who decide to take this course without having passed anatomy and physiology 1 and 2 should be aware that they are likely to perform poorly in this course. This course will contain significantly more depth and material than a foundation (non-majors) level biology course. The workload / expectations between allied health students and foundation level students in this course will be identical.

All majors in Health professions must complete the core curriculum requirements in order to graduate with either an Associate’s degree or Bachelor’s degree (http://catalog.gsu.edu/associate20162017/1400-university-degree-requirements-and-graduation/#core-curriculum-requirements). For area D (natural and computational sciences) a science sequence course (which means both lectures and labs, or combined courses for each part of the sequence) must be completed and a math class. A science sequence means two science courses where the second course has the first course as a prerequisite. Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 and 2 does not count as the science sequence course as it is not an accepted course for the core curriculum. That means you must take a science sequence course other than Human Anatomy & Physiology to meet graduation requirements.
I strongly recommend taking the Science courses in the following order (take other core curriculum required classes around these each semester), as it will prepare you with the required knowledge for the courses through the entire sequence: CHEM-1151 (lecture and lab, or a combined course); the next semester take CHEM-1152 (lecture and lab, or a combined course) and BIOL-2110 (lecture and lab, or a combined course); the next semester take BIOL-2120 (lecture and lab, or a combined course); the next semester take BIOL-2300 and BIOL-2310.
If you wish to graduate by taking the least number of science courses, select CHEM-1151 (lecture and lab, or a combined course) and CHEM-1152 (lecture and lab, or a combined course) as your science sequence. To graduate with an Associate’s degree in many of the health professions you must take CHEM-1151 (or CHEM-1211 and CHEM-1212), and to graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in many of the health professions you must take CHEM-1151 and CHEM-1152 (or CHEM-2400 and CHEM-2401).

Taking courses in a different order will mean you are lacking the knowledge and skills instructors assume you already have when you go through the entire sequence of courses. This could severely disadvantage you in those courses. Attempting to take these courses in a different order and withdrawing when you realize you are not prepared for the course will probably impact your application to the health profession programs and will definitely count towards your withdrawal limits. The withdrawal policy (https://catalog.gsu.edu/associate20162017/university-academic-regulations/#dropping-classes-and-voluntary-withdrawal) limits you to 3 W’s at the Associate’s level and 6 W’s total by the end of Bachelor’s level. Perimeter College is considered the Associate level, regardless of whether you intend to get an Associate’s degree or Bachelor’s degree. Once you have reached 3 W’s, all withdrawals will result in WF grades, which count as an F towards your GPA and can affect your financial aid.

 

 

GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY POLICIES

Class Withdrawal:

https://catalog.gsu.edu/associate20162017/university-academic-regulations/#dropping-classes-and-voluntary-withdrawal

Students are responsible for formally dropping or withdrawing from courses using the online registration system, PAWS at paws.gsu.edu. Students should not simply stop attending. Students should be aware of the financial and academic consequences of dropping and withdrawing from courses by consulting with an academic advisor and referring to information concerning the tuition refund schedule found on the Student Financial Services’ web page, which is located on the www.gsu.edu website.
Georgia State University reserves the right, at any time during the semester, to drop any student from classes for failure to pay tuition and fees. However, students should not assume that Georgia State will drop them from classes for failure to pay tuition and fees.

Students formally withdrawing from all classes may be entitled to a partial refund of their fees (see Section 1240).
In an emergency situation that precludes personal action to withdraw from classes, a student may communicate with the Office of the Dean of Students, http://deanofstudents.gsu.edu/.

 

1332.20 Withdrawals and Drops from Satellite Courses and Cancelled Courses
In general, if a student voluntarily withdraws from a course at a satellite location, then the normal withdrawal policy applies (see section 1332.10). If the off-campus course’s schedule does not match a Georgia State University term, then the mid-point of the course will be the mid-point of the period from the first off-campus meeting of the course to the last meeting of the course.
If a course is cancelled by Georgia State after the first week of classes, then the student may choose between the following options:

Involuntary Withdrawal (Faculty Initiated)
Science class instructors will not be performing any faculty initiated withdrawals from classes after the roll verification is completed. It is the students’ responsibility to withdraw from classes and to complete all of the required forms for withdrawals.

1332.40 Emergency Withdrawal
Students may request an emergency withdrawal when a non-academic emergency situation occurs that prevents them from completing their course work (e.g., severe medical problems, traumatic events) and when the timing or nature of the emergency prevents them from voluntarily withdrawing from their classes. (See Section 1332.10.) Emergency withdrawals are subject to the following restrictions:

Emergency withdrawals normally apply to all the courses a student took in a semester. In exceptional cases, emergency withdrawals may be granted for some of a student’s courses. Students requesting an emergency withdrawal in some but not all of their courses must provide documentation to justify a partial withdrawal.
If a student is granted an emergency withdrawal, W grades will automatically be awarded.  W grades awarded as a result of the emergency withdrawal process do not count against the student’s voluntary withdrawal limits. (See Section 1332.10.)
For further information on emergency withdrawals, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at deanofstudents.gsu.edu.

1332.45 Military Withdrawal
Withdrawal for Military Service: Refunds and Grades
Full refunds of tuition and mandatory fees and pro rata refunds of elective fees may be considered for students who are:

  1. Military reservists (including members of the National Guard) who, after having enrolled in courses and paid tuition and fees, receive orders without prior notice to active duty, reassigned for temporary duty, or mandatory training and the orders prevent completion of the term;
  2. Commissioned officers of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) who receive deployment orders in response to a public health crisis or national emergency after having enrolled in courses and paid tuition and fees and the orders prevent completion of the term;
  3. Active duty military personnel who, after having enrolled in courses and paid tuition and fees, receive reassignment, a temporary duty assignment, or a training assignment without prior notice and the orders prevent completion of the term; or,
  4. Otherwise unusually and detrimentally affected by the activation of members of the reserve components or the deployment of active duty personnel of the Armed Forces of the United States who demonstrate a need for exceptional equitable relief.

This policy does not apply to a student enlisting in the Armed Forces prior to or during a semester, unless the student presents documentation showing his/her date to report to initial training was changed without the student’s prior knowledge and the new reporting date prevents completion of the term.
Students must officially withdraw and submit official orders to the Office of the Registrar, Military Outreach Center prior to leaving for the assignment. The student is not eligible for a military withdrawal in any course in which the student has completed the course requirements (for example, taking the final exam or submitting the final paper) and/or a grade has been assigned. Elective fees are to be prorated according to the date on which the student officially withdraws. Students who withdraw and receive a full tuition refund will receive a grade of “WM” (military withdrawal) for all courses from which the student has withdrawn.
Appeals Committee
Per the BOR’s policy on Military Service Refunds, 7.3.5.3, requests for exceptional relief are made directly to the president of the institution and the president will make a determination on each request expeditiously.
Requests for course withdrawals due to military service will first be considered by the certifying officials in the Office of the Registrar, Military Outreach Center. If a student’s request is denied and the student feels his/her case requires exceptional relief due to an unusual or detrimental activation, then the request will be considered by the Military Outreach Committee.
The Military Outreach Committee consists of academic advisors, VA benefit certifying officials, ROTC representatives, associate deans and university representatives from the Counseling Center and Affirmative Action. This committee will make recommendations to approve or deny students’ requests to the Vice President for Enrollment and Provost/VP for Academic Affairs.
Appeals of the decision of the Vice President for Enrollment and Provost/VP for Academic Affairs may be initiated by the student within 5 business days of notification of the Vice President for Enrollment’s decision and will be considered by the Provost.
Appeals of the decision of the Provost may be initiated by the student within 5 business days of notification of the Provost’s decision and will be considered by the President.

1332.50 Non-Academic Withdrawal
See the Student Code of Conduct:  http://codeofconduct.gsu.edu/

 

Add/drop period: Students will be able to adjust their course schedule online through the end of the fifth day of the semester.

 

GENERAL NOTES FOR CLASSES

Lecture classes: All lecture tests (except the final comprehensive exam) will be given on iCollege. It is your responsibility to ensure you have adequate internet speed, access to a computer, and to check the iCollege maintenance schedule.

Lockdown Browser with a webcam is required for all tests in iCollege:

Earning your grade: You are expected to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding to earn grades. The grade you earn in class, whether an online class or a face-to-face class, is used to demonstrate your competency in the course. Any form of misrepresenting your knowledge, understanding, and/or competency in any graded test/assignment is considered cheating. This includes, but is not limited to, copying and pasting correct answer feedback from previous attempts of online tests where you have reviewed the questions or googling questions and copying/pasting answers from online. This is not acceptable. If you do this then you have only demonstrated that you can copy and paste, and not that you have understood and learned the course material. A grade of zero will be given for the entire test, and this zero grade will not be dropped when your lowest graded item grade is dropped. These are just two examples, any form of deceiving the instructor about your knowledge, understanding, and/or competency on graded work will result in zero grades for that work and the other penalties listed in the cheating/plagiarism section of the class syllabus can and will also be applied. Dr Hollier can ask you to explain the content of any work you submit for a grade and if you fail to be able to explain what you submitted you can face the penalties for cheating / plagiarism. For more information on cheating and plagiarism see the sections in the syllabus referring to each graded assignment, assessed work, plagiarism, and cheating/plagiarism, and any other applicable sections in this syllabus.

Important Topics in lecture classes: Important topics covers material that unites the chapters together, is information that underlies the chapter material, and/or provides the basis for a significant proportion of pathophysiology (which is how damage/harm occurs to a host/person). To do well in the medical field, your future careers, it is more than just memorizing facts. You have to be able to link things together, and understand how that information relates to the anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of the material. This requires critical thinking and understanding the topics that are listed as important topics. In Anatomy & Physiology the important topics are diffusion/active transport/osmosis, pH, and inflammation. In Microbiology the important topics are diffusion/active transport/osmosis, pH, inflammation, endotoxin, transmission methods, and virulence factors.

Laboratory classes: All students enrolled in any science laboratory class MUST read the Science Laboratory Safety Contract for Students and review the Perimeter College Safety Training PowerPoint Presentation. Students MUST then print off the first page (signature page), sign it, and turn a copy in to ALL your individual science class instructors.

Laboratory classes: Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are available for lab classes: A&P1 Lab, A&P2 Lab, and Microbiology Lab.